Sweet Soul Music: Rhythm and Blues and the Southern Dream of Freedom (Paperback)

Sweet Soul Music: Rhythm and Blues and the Southern Dream of Freedom

From Library Journal
“A definitive chronicle of one of the great creative periods in American pop history,” said LJ’s reviewer of this 1986 volume, which tracks the rise and fall of a collaboration of white and black musicians, songwrite (more…)

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8 Comments

  1. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    must-have reference book for the Soul lover
    If you love soul music and want to understand it from the inside out this book is for you. It is full of facts, myths debunked, and a scholarly yet very sensitive and thoughtful…

  2. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Outstanding Look at What Made Soul Extraordinary
    In “Sweet Soul Music,” Peter Guralnick explains what made soul music great. He views soul as a distinct genre, separate from Motown, which was performed primarily by black singers…

  3. 4.0 out of 5 stars
    get the facts right
    I bought this book in the gift shop at the newly resurrected Stax Records museum in Memphis… the Satellite Record Shop, next door to the museum.

  4. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    A GREAT JUSTICE FOR SOUL MUSIC!
    THis is The Kind Of Book For Lovers OF Real SOul&it’s Early History&Impact.So Many Great Artists.this Book Is Music To The Eyes&Heart.Very Well Detailed.

  5. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    The Primer For Soul Music
    If you want a starting place in your search to find REAL Soul music, look no further than this book. Guralnick points you in the right direction.

  6. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Brings Liner Notes to Life
    I stumbled upon this book, having seen neither a review nor promotional ad for it. Sometimes it STILL is worthwhile to wander into a bookstore when not online.

  7. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    A thorough look at the creation of southern soul
    When I read this book, I could not put it down. It was truly an engrossing read. From the early beginnings of southern R&B through Ray Charles, Sam Cooke, Solomon Burke,…

  8. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    Essential reading in social history
    A thoroughly delightful book…glad to see it coming back into print. The STAX records story here is every bit as facinating as the earlier Memphis tale of Sun Records.